Event type: Seminar

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11
Oct

Anita Layton
(University of Waterloo)

His and Her Mathematical Models of Physiological Systems
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Imagine someone having a heart attack. Do you visualize the dramatic Hollywood portrayal of a heart attack, in which a man collapses, grabbing his chest in agony? Even though heart disease is the leading killer of women worldwide, the misconception that heart disease is a men’s disease has persisted. A dangerous misconceptions and risks women ignoring their own symptoms. Gender biases and false impressions are by no means limited to heart attack symptoms. Such prejudices exist throughout our healthcare system, from scientific research to disease diagnosis and treatment strategies. A goal of our research program is to address this gender equity, by identifying and disseminating insights into sex differences in health and disease, using computational modeling tools.
Oct 11, 2022 DRL 2C8 Seminar
Next Event
06
Sep

Marte Julie Sætra
(Simula Research Laboratory)

Computational modeling of ion concentration dynamics in brain tissue
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Over the past decades, computational neuroscientists have developed ever more sophisticated and morphologically complex neuron models. Most of these models assume that the intra- and extracellular ion concentrations remain constant over the simulated period and thus do not account for concentration-dependent effects on neuronal firing properties. Of the models that do incorporate ion concentration dynamics, few account for the electrodiffusive nature of intra- and extracellular ion transport. In this talk, I will present the first multicompartmental neuron model that accounts for ion concentration dynamics in a biophysically consistent manner [1]. I will also show how electrodiffusive modeling of neurons and glial cells can be used to explore the genesis of slow potentials in the brain [2].
Sep 6, 2022 DRL 2C8 Seminar
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26
Apr

Alexandre Morozov
(Rutgers University)

Apr 26, 2022 Online & DRL Room A1 Seminar
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22
Mar

Danielle Bassett
(University of Pennsylvania)

Mar 22, 2022 Online Seminar
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29
Mar

Georgi Medvedev
(Drexel University)

Mar 29, 2022 Online & DRL Room A1 Seminar
Next Event
05
Apr

Andrew Mugler
(University of Pittsburgh)

Apr 5, 2022 Online & DRL Room A1 Seminar
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12
Apr

Isaac Klapper
(Temple University)

Apr 12, 2022 Online & DRL Room A1 Seminar
Next Event
19
Apr

Katie Storey
(Lafayette University)

Apr 19, 2022 DRL Room A1 Seminar
Next Event
16
Mar

Adrian Lam
(Ohio State University)

Some PDEs in Evolution of Dispersal
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In the first part of the talk, we discuss the multi-species competition in a spatial domain, particularly the result of A. Hastings and some recent progress on the conjecture by Dockery et al. concerning the evolution of slow dispersal, i.e. when other things are equal, the slowest diffuser can competitively exclude other competitors. We then discuss the effect of adding passive drift and how it changes the evolutionary dynamics so that fast/intermediate diffuser is selected. In the second part, we will discuss the effect of mutation, and the associated moving Dirac solutions in a nonlocal PDE model proposed by Perthame and Souganidis. This latter equation describes a population structured by space and a phenotypic trait, and can be understood as competition of infinitely many species with different rate of dispersal.
Mar 16, 2021 Online Seminar
Next Event
23
Mar

Lisa Fauci
(Tulane University)

Spinning helices, heaving panels, and waving tails
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The observed gait of a swimmer arises from the interplay of internal force generation, the passive elastic properties of its body, and environmental features such as fluid viscosity, boundaries, and obstacles. One could question whether optimal swimming of a fish occurs when it is actuated at a frequency near a natural frequency determined by its material bending rigidity. We will share some insights that we have gained using computational models of a few systems that range from the Stokes regime to others where inertial forces are important.
Mar 23, 2021 Online Seminar
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